MEASURING DRAW LENGTHS...help button





Arm Span MethodMEASURE YOURSELF FOR DRAW LENGTH: To measure your personal draw length, determine the length of your arm-span in inches. Stand with your arms out and palms facing forward. Don't stretch when measuring. Just stand naturally. Have someone else help you, and measure from the tip of one middle finger to the other. Then simply divide that number by 2.5. The quotient is your proper draw length (in inches) for your body size. The majority of compound bow owners set their bows for too much draw length, which results in poor shooting form - inaccuracy - and painful string slap on the forearm. You will better enjoy - and be more successful with your new bow when it is fitted properly to your body. And REMEMBER! If in doubt, choose a little LESS draw length rather than a little more. If you are still unsure, or plan to shoot with a string loop, you may benefit from reading our Additional Discussion on Draw Length.

Measure Armspan 2A NATURAL CORRELATION: If you are a person of average proportions, your arm-span will be roughly equal to your height (in inches). So there is often a direct correlation between a person's height and their draw length. But if you are particularly lankly, stocky, etc., the arm-span/2.5 method will correct for your uniqueness and yield the most reliable estimate. Even so, once you have computed your draw length using the method above, you can double-check yourself by using the scale below - to see if your numbers are in the ballpark.


LONG DRAW SHOOTERS:

Long Draw Length Scale


SHORT DRAW SHOOTERS:

Short Draw Length Scale


A FINAL THOUGHT ON DRAW LENGTH: If you're new to the sport, don't get too carried away dissecting yourself down to the micron. You'll have better luck if you just play the averages and choose an initial draw length that's similar to others of your same size and stature. Fortunately, on most bows, making a minor draw length change is pretty simple. So it's not quite a life or death decision to start. However, as you become more immersed in the sport and begin to "fine-tune" your game, you may wish to experiment a little with your draw length.